Newly Discovered Algae May Help Coral Survive Hottest Reefs On The Planet

Francis YupangcoBy Francis Yupangco 4 years ago
Home  /  Conservation  /  Newly Discovered Algae May Help Coral Survive Hottest Reefs On The Planet

persian-coral-reef Researchers have traveled to the Middle East, to study coral in some of the Worlds hottest coral reefs, to see how they withstand such temperatures. Having lived in the Middle East for many years myself, and doing countless reef dives there, the water was some of the warmest I have ever dove in. Diving in the Middle East in the Summers was like swimming in warm bath water. The scientists went to Abu Dabhi to see how the corals could survive in such high temperatures, where they discovered a new species of algae from the coral samples taken. [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m9p0py1KN5g&w=560&h=315] The algae was named ‘Symbiodinium Thermophilum’ for the algae’s ability to withstand very high temperatures. The findings are published in the Journal Scientific Reports. Hopefully this discovery can lead to application to Coral reefs around the world, to fight global warming and coral bleaching. MORE

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  Conservation, Corals, Fish, Science
Francis Yupangco
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 Francis Yupangco

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Francis is a marine biologist with an MBA and over 20 years of professional aquarium experience. Francis is the former Aquatic Development Manager at Hagen USA., makers of Fluval brand aquarium products. He co-stars on Nat Geo WILD's reality TV series Fish Tank Kings where he is the resident "Fish Geek" and was Director of Marketing at Living Color Aquariums. He is an avid explorer having visited over 45 countries and lived in 7. At 17, he was among the youngest aquarists ever hired by the Vancouver Aquarium, where he worked for 7 years. His aquatic biology experience ranges from larval fish rearing to the design, construction and operational management of renowned public aquariums around the world. Francis is currently head of marketing at the world's largest vertically integrated fish farming company.

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