A Fireworks Jelly (Halitrephes) To Ring In The New Year

Joe RowlettBy Joe Rowlett 10 months ago
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A Burst of Deep Sea Fireworks: Halitrephes Jelly | Nautilus Live

We’re starting this year with deep sea fireworks, and a spirit of exploration! When something remarkable floats by in the middle of sampling operations, our team quickly switches gears to marvel and document. The frilled tentacles of the Halitrephes maasi jelly came into view at 1225m in the Revillagigedo Archipelago off Baja California, Mexico.

 What better way is there to ring in the new year than a deep sea jelly that’s exploding with color? Halitrephes maasi is a spectacular hydromedusan that’s found all across the world’s temperate and tropical waters. This video documents the first report of it from the Eastern Pacific Ocean and was filmed in the depths off Socorro in the Revillagigedo Islands, the same remote area where the Clarion Angelfish is endemic. Happy New Year!

Category:
  Invertebrates
Joe Rowlett
About

 Joe Rowlett

  (447 articles)

Joe is classically trained in the zoological arts and sciences, with a particular focus on the esoterica of invertebrate taxonomy and evolution. He’s written for several aquarium publications and for many years lorded over the marinelife at Chicago’s venerable Old Town Aquarium. He currently studies prairie insect ecology at the Field Museum of Natural History and fish phylogenetics at the University of Chicago.

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