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Anonymous

Guest
Twice in the past week the air line outlet to the powerhead has gotten stopped up with algae or crud and allowed air to build up to the point the siphon stopped. The result was water on the floor. Needless to say, that ain't so good. It stops up on the inside at the opening to the fitting and can be easily cleaned with a toothpick. Anyone else had this problem? I'm about ready to get a conventional U tube overflow. I never have this problem with them.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
My observation of the CPR overflows. They work best when pushed to their maximum output.The CPR 150 is rated for 1600gph and the closer your return pump can get to that, the better. A high flow rate doesn't allow for air bubble accumulation within the unit. I have repeated real and simulated power outages and they siphon has always restarted. Most of the people I have talked to that have had problems with a CPR overflow, haven't come close to the units maximum return rate.

More to your point... if algae is building up in air siphon valve, try using a tape to block light from the valve and tubing.


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Eric
customer.wcta.net/emcreef




[This message has been edited by Eroc (edited 17 December 1999).]
 
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Anonymous

Guest
It's not just a question of algae. The airline off the vent will act as a sort of mini-skimmer as the bubbles burst in the line. So it will need to be cleaned periodically in any case.

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fwiw, imo, ime, ymmv, etc.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
G-

That may be true, but I run my vent plugged most of the time and the unit still doesn't collect air and it restarts anytime there is a power outage. In addition, the two six gallon surge buckets I use add alot of additional bubbles without affecting the function of the overflow.

The only time I have had the siphon break, bubble collection problem is when I took my main circ pump offline for maintenance and seal refitting and used my backup pump. The backup is about 1000 gph less output. Returned to the main pump... no problems. This is just my observation of using the CPR for over 2 years.

My thoughts... the return pump needs to be closely matched to the overflow to avoid the above hassles.

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Eric
customer.wcta.net/emcreef
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Those CPR overflows can be a real pain. I finally drilled my tank because I got so fed up w/ mine. ( I had an Acrylic tank, so it wasn't so bad...) Anyway, I would just try to eliminate as much light getting into the area where the air vent is and put a strong powerhead on the thing (to suck through). Then I would get a lot of Tums and keep eating them while you're away from the tank so you don't get an ulcer worrying about it. hehe. Sorry, I wish I could be more help, but I tried everything w/ the damn thing.

One thing that I had considered was to try and drill a larger hole in the top of the overflow and then hook a pump to that hole somehow. A larger hole would be more dufficult to clog, but it would be tough to implement. Maybe you're more constructive than me though...
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Hi Harry,

I have the 600gph CPR overflow and have the same problem one time. I adjusted it so the siphon side is slightly lower, thus alge is usually sucked through before the siphon can get a hold of it. The other thing you have to do with these overflows is clean them out on a regualr basis. The time interval depends on how much algae your system has and how quickly the siphon collects it. The extra work is a hassle, but less so than a power outage that a J-tube overflow can't restart from.

Good luck!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Eroc & Goldengoby - The algae is not growing there, just a little "gob" passing through gets sucked up to the vent and stops it up.

srbayless - which side did you elevate? The side with the vent or the other side?
 


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