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Anonymous

Guest
I know you guys have been asked this question a million times before, but my aiptasia seems to be multiplying faster than ever and quickly taking over portions of my tank. My question is, what is the best, fastest and most effective way to deal with these little pests so that they will not return? Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I've always seen Peppermint Shrimp(Lysmata wurdmanni) do wonderous jobs at keeping it in check. Some aiptasia-looking anemones are NOT and the shrimp tend to ignore these, but these species seldom spread like aiptaisa does.

Keep in mind that this doesn't occur overnight, but usually within a month, you have no aiptasia and a fat peppermint shrimp. I've always found that adding at least 3-4 per 50 gallons works the best as well.

Tom


------------------
Visit Tom's Reef
http://www.bit-net.com/~tjotoole/

proud to be an associate of

Inland Reef Aquaria, Nashua, NH
http://www.inlandreef.com/
 
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Anonymous

Guest
John,

I too had aptasia running amock in my tank. I added a few true peppermint shrimp, and within a few days, all of the aptasia were gone, and have not returned. The shrimp are now detritovores, and to my knowledge have not damaged any other inhabitants of my tank. The other bonus is that they spawn frequently and produce plankton that is eaten by my sea fan. Copperbanded butterfly fish can be employed, but they are more delicate, more expensive and potentially destructive to corals. Certain nudibranchs eat aptasia, but since it is there only food, they starve when the aptasia are gone. Aptasia can be injected with concentrated kalk or peroxide, but this is marginally effective, tedious, and can damage other organisms. Bottom line, peppermint shrimp are really the way to go, just make sure you don't get camel shrimp instead. Good luck!!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Adam,
In the above post you say to make sure you don't get a Camel shrimp. Is there some reason not to get a Camel shrimp? I'm not implying anything but if there is something about them that may be detrimental to my tank I would really appreciate the info, 'cause I have a camel, a peppermint and a blood shrimp in my tank. BTW the peppermint shrimp did an excellent job of the Aptasia in my tank and the blood shrimp eats the parasites from my fishies!!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Camel shrimp will munch on corals, fan worms, clams, polyps, etc.

As with all animals, their tastes will vary but I have seen one eat a large chunk of a duster cluster in an hour.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Do emerald brittle stars eat peppermint shrimp? and are the regular anenomes safe from the peppermint shrimp?
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I've also used a hypodermic needle to inject kalkwasser into them. This method worked great for me.

Bill
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Camel shrimp (Rhynchocinetes durbanensis) is often confused with the Peppermint Shrimp (Lysmata wurdemanni) though they are pretty easy to tell apart. Camel shrimp have very large eyes and a large beak-like rostrum(appendage on face). Pictures of both on pg 383 of Fenner's Conscientious Marine Aquarist.

Camels will decimate a reef tank, seen them dine on ricordia, mushrooms and other corals quite readily.

No Peppermint shrimp will not harm other anemones, they don't even seem to harm aiptasia look alikes.

I'm assuming by the term "Emerald Brittle Star" you mean O. incrassata and no they should get along fine with Peppermint shrimp. They are just about the most rambunctious of all the brittle stars but unless something is seriously ill they will leave it alone. YMMV

Tom


------------------
Visit Tom's Reef
http://www.bit-net.com/~tjotoole/

proud to be an associate of

Inland Reef Aquaria, Nashua, NH
http://www.inlandreef.com/
 

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