reefs magazine

2017-1


Editor's Note - 2017-1

As we close out the warmest February in NYC recorded history, Reefs Magazine offers up its “Winter” issue. Inside you will find some groundbreaking achievements and some practical advice too. Our feature from Todd Gardner details yet another of his milestone achievements in the captive rearing of marine ornamentals – this time he cracks the life cycle of the rarely seen Flathead Perch (Rainfordia opercularis). Veteran fish breeder Kathy Leahy also recounts her Fish Tales of rearing Coral Beauty Angels (Centopyge bispinosa) in her small, landlocked home facility in St. Louis. Together these two accounts demonstrate how small scale breeding facilities are helping lead the way in the rapidly expanding field of marine ornamental aquaculture. Richard Ross and Luiz Rocha, both from the California Academy of Sciences, take us far beneath the sea on separate exploration and collection adventures into deeper ocean habitats in search of rarely seen animals destined for public display. Rich’s quest is the adorable Flapjack octopus, attainable only via ROV submarine collection in the Monterey Bay. Luiz plunges us into the Twilight Zone of the South Pacific to collect deepwater reef fishes for a new display at the Steinhart Aquarium. A review of the Ecotech Marine G-4 LED fixture in our sister publication the Reefs.com blog garnered such accolades that we have decided to reproduce it here. This marks the first time that we have cross-published material, but Marcin Smok’s detailed product review sets new standards for the aquarium industry and we feel it is deserving of a wider audience. On the practical side, Austin Lefevre offers some wise words for hobbyists new to keeping corals—in short, don’t get caught up in the coral collectors game until you cut your teeth on still spectacular but more mundane animals. Finally, Felicia McCaulley, calls upon both her vast experience and the scientific literature to help us battle Vibrio diseases in seahorses. Lots and lots of great stuff here. Happy Reefing, Randy