AC & CM @ David Lynch’s Festival of Disruption

This Saturday, May 19th we premiere the live version of Tangerine Reef at David Lynch’s Festival of Disruption. We will be selling a limited number of a special lunar phase calendar (seen above) at the show in honor of our audiovisual collaboration with Animal Collective. Tags: Animal Collective, Brooklyn Steel, Coral Morphologic, David Lynch, Festival of Disruption This entry was posted on Wednesday, May 16th, 2018 at 1:26 pm and is filed under Live. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Blotched/Borbonius Anthia Care Info

MY FB: https://www.facebook.com/coralfish12g The Borbonius Anthia is most commonly referred to as a blotched Anthia and it is one of the most prized of all reef fish. Because of its unique pink and yellow coloration, the Blotched Anthias has become very popular. Since it is a deep water Anthias, it requires a slightly lower temperate tank. They max out at about 6 inches in full adult form, so they should stay in tanks larger than 90 gallons. Lots of live rock should be in your tank for Blotched Anthias to thrive. The rock will provide lots of cover from lighting and areas to hide if spooked. Blotched Anthias should be fed multiple times per day with a variety of meaty foods such as mysis and brine shrimp. It can be somewhat aggressive so be sure that your tank is ready for it if you are willing drop the $300 dollar price tag that this brilliant fish usually comes with! The video and pics used in this CoralFish12g video are Henry Ludywidjaja's and special thank goes out to him!

Emma Forbes Update: Understanding Bacteria at OI

Figure 1. Culture of bacteria (Pseudomonas sp.??) on marine agar isolated from larval rearing tanks at OI.Aloha everyone!It’s been a while since my last post, but it’s been a busy few months. Though it's the kind of busy you don't realize until you sit down and catch your breath. It’s been a lot of fun spending my days in the lab working with everyone learning new things. Figure 2. Sample of Parvocalanus nauplii on TCBS agar that was fed to yellow tang larvae. Since we are still observing relatively high mortality just past first feeding, my work at the Oceanic Institute is focused on bacterial population analysis and application of probiotics to our yellow tang larval rearing tanks. The first month of summer was spent looking at the growth of our live feeds with the addition of probiotics, which appear to have no effect on their survival or growth. This is great news for us
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