Deep-Sea Nudibranch

Good morning out there, I have something a bit different for you all this morning, something other than a crab or fish for once.. This is a super tiny, very fragile deep-sea nudibranch, one of only two we found on the whole trip to St. Eustatius. And when I say one of two, that means we found this one above and another that is completely different which I will get posted as well in the coming days. 

Deep Sea Crab found by Smithsonian Scientists

Good morning, I have another wild looking deep-sea crab for you all this morning found by our favorite scientists from the world famous Smithsonian Institution in Washington. The red you see under the belly could be eggs but don’t quote me on that, I just remember hearing that in the lab as everyone was watching observing her. This crab was close to 6 inches wide and most likely even longer with those crazy claws extended. Most of you already know my love for any and all crabs which must come from the insane amount of hours spend either underwater or with the Smithsonian observing them, they are so cool and they come in every shape and size one can imagine. Sorry so short, I’m so busy with so many weird things these days, have a great day out there.. Barry NEWER POST:

Varicus cephalocellatus, Deep-Sea Goby, Tiny Reef Fish

I have a tiny one inch or less Varicus cephalocellatus, goby for you all today found by our world renowned scientists from the Smithsonian Institution using a deep sea submersible from Substation Curacao (yes where I used to work). For any ichthyologist finding these deep sea fish is about as good as it gets and from what I have observed working with the Smithsonian, finding new species of gobies is better than finding a ship full of gold! When these fish get brought up and are actually seen for the first time there is yelling and excitement in the air not to mention an occasional high-five for a job well done and for finding a possible new species of fish. I have to say, anyone who ever said “scientists are boring” hasn’t met the group from the Smithsonian Institution, they are anything but boring and when their not holding a fish they are out doing something else fun. Have a great day..

Squirrelfish, Sargocentron sp.

Good morning out there, I hope you all had a great weekend and went out and did something fun. I have a small, three inch Sargocentron sp. or squirrelfish for you today once again found on our last expedition to St. Eustatius, which is a super tiny island in the Caribbean. Remember we talked about the “sp.” which means “species’ meaning it may or may not be a new species from this family, we all have to sit tight and wait for a little DNA to come back before we all know for sure. Squirrelfish tend to spend their days hanging out in the shadows or under reef overhangs minding their own business and become more active at night.

Deep-Sea Crab

Good morning, I have a cool little crab (about 2 inches wide) from the recent Statia expedition found with a deep-sea submersible by scientists from the Smithsonian Institution and Substation Curacao. Crabs are not always easy to photograph! This one here kept burying himself in the sand with just his or her eyes showing, so finally I gave up and covered the sand with shells giving this little guy no options other than to just sit there and smile for the camera. I’m guessing that this is some kind of swimming crab but again once I get a positive ID I will update these blogs. Have a great day out there.. Barry NEWER POST:
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