New seahorse tank

jamesonwhiskey

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You can see my other post here, but basically I'm starting a new tank and want seahorses. It's a 54g corner bow 24" deep. I'm going to start very slowly but eventually would like 6-8 seahorses, a few peaceful fish, coral and macro in the DP... I'm still researching the different types of seahorses.

Before my tank crashed I kept it at 80 degrees and it did very well. I could go lower with my chiller to around 78... but getting it down to 74 will be super costly, if impossible without upgrading my chiller, as my pump gives off a lot of heat. The chiller used to run even in the winter!

My biggest question now, before deciding to go seahorses or not, is what temperature is best for what type of seahorse?

http://www.manhattanreefs.com/forum/reefs-beginners/111816-another-tank-crash-what-next.html#post1046188
 

Imbarrie

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Wanted to add something without hijacking your thread.

I have read a lot of posts concerning seahorse tanks that focus on keeping them colder than reef tanks. In the low 70's was the most common range with nothing above 74 degrees.

I have been diving in water with seahorses of all sizes from dwarf 1 inch, probably babies, to fully mature 6-8 inches. In the tropics the water gets up to 85 deg in the summer and maybe down to 78 in the winter.

Is the colder temperature for more northern varieties that live in 50-70 degree water and more tropical seahorses can live comfortably in 78-80 degree aquariums?

I ask because I am looking to upgrade a fuge to 75 gallon and put some seahorses in there.
 

basiab

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I used to use a site called seahorse.org that had lots of info and specific categories for different issues.
As far as fish with seahorses the problem is that seahorses feed very slooowly and if you have a fish in there he is going to beat all the seahorses to the food regardless of how peacefull the fish is. But it has been done.
 

Imbarrie

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Yes you have to house them with other slow eating fish also.

Pipefish and clown gobies are good tank mates.
I was thinking about a mandarin also.
 

NYC Joe

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The low temp is to keep disease at bay.
The higher the temp. The higher the risk of an infection.

The low temp ensures that they will be heathier

I've done seahorses with other fish too.
They are bad swimmers, eat slow, and others outcompete them for food

Anything from 70-74 should be fine. But stability is key.

Also they the of tank they need is specific.
Lots of things to grab on to.
Gorgs etc. also stinging coral is a no-no
Powerheads must be covered etc.

If you google" seahorse compatability list"
Youll find some great fish to go with them.
As well as good info. Too
Research, research, research.
 

jamesonwhiskey

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The low temp is to keep disease at bay.
The higher the temp. The higher the risk of an infection.

The low temp ensures that they will be heathier

I've done seahorses with other fish too.
They are bad swimmers, eat slow, and others outcompete them for food

Anything from 70-74 should be fine. But stability is key.

Also they the of tank they need is specific.
Lots of things to grab on to.
Gorgs etc. also stinging coral is a no-no
Powerheads must be covered etc.

If you google" seahorse compatability list"
Youll find some great fish to go with them.
As well as good info. Too
Research, research, research.
Yeah I found a couple of good lists already... definitely want another Mandarin as I had mine over a year until my tank crashed.

The temperature thing is what's really holding me back right now from going with the seahorses. I'm going to re-setup my tank this weekend and start cycling it so I still have time to decide on what to do.

Does anyone know of a pump that won't heat my tank so much? Maybe I should just find the one with the lowest wattage for the GPH I need. My corals seemed to thrive at 78-80... would they do as well at 74-ish?
 

qy7400

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Eheim or water blaster pumps are good, they don't transferring as much heat back into the water and can be used internal or external.

Be careful with your coral selection as many do not get along with seahorse plus pumps in the tank need to be selected very carefully, many pumps can seriously harm them; especially damage to their tail.
 

jamesonwhiskey

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Be careful with your coral selection as many do not get along with seahorse plus pumps in the tank need to be selected very carefully, many pumps can seriously harm them; especially damage to their tail.
well my pump would be in my sump for the return... i would put mesh around any powerheads in my tank but would keep them to a minimum
 

Imbarrie

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You would probably be better getting some much smaller koralia powerheads than a MP40.
The nano ones are a little over 400 gph, low power consumption, and you would have the same flow with a better distribution throughout the tank instead of from one source.
The guard on the Koralia intakes is much better also.
 

NYC Joe

Seahorses yea!
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The guard on the koralia is much better.
But I remember having to save a seahorse from that too.

Wrap all powerheads in mesh. And keep them clean.
I have a vortech on one side and a koralia on the other.
 

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