Importance of Disaster Plan’s For Public Aquariums

Francis YupangcoBy Francis Yupangco 4 years ago
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sharknado-attackWinter is coming. With it comes notoriously unpredictable weather. Snowstorms and blizzards can poise difficult challenges for zoos and aquariums and even your average hobbyists. Infectious disease and natural disasters like hurricanes, earthquakes and typhoons are not just cause for concern for people. Natural disasters leave aquariums susceptible to power outages, staff shortages, and possibly lack of food, clean water and medicine too. Infectious diseases can devastate animal population. Its important to be prepared with a plan in case of emergency. For the past four years, folks at the US Department of Agriculture Division of Animal Care and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, and  the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine has been having emergency preparedness trials at small and large facilities. The main point is there needs to be a plan. Its important to stay calm in the face of chaos. To stay calm you need to know what to do, how to do it, and who does what. Knowing what animals to move and in what order makes the most out of valuable time. There is nothing worse than spinning wheels when time is running out and the crisis is approaching.Hopefully this has inspired you to create your own disaster plan to save your fishy friends from the zombie apocalypse or other impending forms of doom. MORE

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  Fish, Science
Francis Yupangco
About

 Francis Yupangco

  (449 articles)

Francis is a marine biologist with an MBA and over 20 years of professional aquarium experience. Francis is the former Aquatic Development Manager at Hagen USA., makers of Fluval brand aquarium products. He co-stars on Nat Geo WILD's reality TV series Fish Tank Kings where he is the resident "Fish Geek" and was Director of Marketing at Living Color Aquariums. He is an avid explorer having visited over 45 countries and lived in 7. At 17, he was among the youngest aquarists ever hired by the Vancouver Aquarium, where he worked for 7 years. His aquatic biology experience ranges from larval fish rearing to the design, construction and operational management of renowned public aquariums around the world. Francis is currently head of marketing at the world's largest vertically integrated fish farming company.

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