Randy's Improved 2-part recipe

spykes

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supposly i talked to randy, but calireef said washing soda is the baked version of it, and it shows carbonate instead, also a higher PH version and a lower PH version, if you notice if you dont bake it, the PH is lower, and when you do baking it the PH is higher?
 

noodleman

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Well by baking it and shows a higher pH that's most likely due to the CO2 being driven off. Cant find anything about turn bicarb into carbonate simply from baking it. Maybe i'm just not looking hard enough
 

noodleman

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wait nevermind found it, heating it up does transform it into carbonate instead of bicarbonate. So if I can locate and use sodium carbonate it should be fine without the heating
 
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kimoyo

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Washing soda is the baked version of baking soda but it doesn't have to be food-grade which baking soda is.

Randy says, "All you are doing is changing the amount of carbon dioxide in the baking soda:", so it might still be sodium bicarbonate.

Noodleman you have access to laboratory grade sodium bicarbonate? Does laboratory grade mean its still food grade?
 

noodleman

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I'm thinking they use sodium bicarbonate instead of sodium carbonate is because of the extra sodium ion. Most likely it has something to do with the 1 to 1 equivalence to the chloride ion from the calcium chloride.
 

Cloud1921

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Hypothetically speaking, if sodium carbonate is the result of baking, I would assume that proton from sodium bicarb is lost due to the combustion like reaction from releasing CO2 and H2O.

Hence, Carbonate (Na2CO3) has a high alkalinity effect when dosed.
It can accept 2 protons relative to bicarbonate?s (NAHCO3) capability of accepting only 1.

Not really sure which is which, but a 1:1 ratio is most likely evident with sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and calcium chloride (CaCl2), a 1:1 equivalent if considering the exchange of sodium and chloride ions.

However, with brands such as ESV's B-ionic, there is mixture of both alkalinity components of carb and bicarb.
 

noodleman

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yo kris you got a superman rhodactis? But if the 1:1 equivalence is required, then why use the upgraded version with the MgCl? This would add extra Cl- to your sistem. Also the baking can't just add a Na+ ion onto the molecule becuase where is it beinging provided?
 
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