Monday Archives: Squirrelfish sp. Holocentridae

Hi friends, I have one beautiful squirrelfish for you all today found on the last day of operations on our recent trip to St. Eustatius. This colorful little treasure was about three inches in length and I remember Smithsonian being super excited because of this strange color pattern you see above. These fish have such a wonderful relaxed disposition and like I said earlier this week spend their days from the safety of their homes watching the reef go by, they are for the most part very cautious fish. Have a great weekend… Barry NEWER POST:

Monday Archives: Decodon sp., Small Deep-Sea Fish

Good morning, I have another super colorful three inch Decodon for you all this morning, this is one of the three that was found on the St. Eustatius Expedition last month. A Decodon is a type of wrasse and this particular species is one of my favorite to work with because of their super calm behavior and their more or less relaxed attitude. I think I have told you over the years that not all fish are easy to photograph, some can take me hours to get a shot of as they never stop moving unlike this orange beauty that just sat in one place posing forever! I was going through my St. Eustatius folder yesterday and I see that I am close to having posted most of the top finds from that trip, so I will try and finish that up by the end of next week and then we head back to Bonaire

Two more Hermit Crabs with BEAUTIFUL Blue Eyes!

Good morning readers, sorry for the lack of blogs but I have more or less run out of fish and creatures from our Statia 2017 Expedition and have been working on a bunch of coral reef photos from the reefs of St. Eustatius that I will begin posting. Above is my last two deep-sea hermit crabs that were found and collected below 700 feet! For a size reference the top crab is around two inches wide while the bottom hermit is much smaller and both have the glowing blue-eyes which blow me away!! The larger crab had small little anemones all over his shell which are almost impossible to see from these tiny web sized photos. The shell he or she was in looked like it was covered in sand and the anemones were just living under it or stuck to it, you can’t even see the original shell anymore, he may have been hauling that around for awhile

Derilissus sp., Clingfish

Good morning out there, while in St. Eustatius I had a major meltdown one evening when I went to download my 64gb CF card with all the days or weeks photos and found out the card was not working or corrupt, meaning everything I had shot including the above shots were lost until now. I tried onboard the ship to download a rescue pro service from Sandisk and was able to get a few shots off the card but not many. So last week I took the card to a friend who has the latest in card rescue technologies and was able to save 61gb of lost photos, for those of you who don’t know, that’s an insane amount of images! So here’s a few more shots of the new Derilissus sp. or Clingfish that was found by the Smithsonian Institution and Substation Curacao off the coast of St

Derilissus sp., Clingfish

Good morning, I have the third and final Derilissus sp. (clingfish) for you all this morning that the Smithsonian Institution and Substation Curacao found off the tiny coast of St. Eustatius a few months ago. NEWER POST:
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