{"@context":"https://schema.org","@graph":[{"@type":"Organization","@id":"https://reefs.com/#organization","name":"","url":"https://reefs.com/","sameAs":["https://www.facebook.com/reefscom","https://www.linkedin.com/company/reefs-com","http://www.youtube.com/c/Reefscom","https://www.pinterest.com/reefscom/","https://twitter.com/reefscom"]},{"@type":"WebSite","@id":"https://reefs.com/#website","url":"https://reefs.com/","name":"Reefs.com","publisher":{"@id":"https://reefs.com/#organization"},"potentialAction":{"@type":"SearchAction","target":"https://reefs.com/?s={search_term_string}","query-input":"required name=search_term_string"}},{"@type":"WebPage","@id":"https://reefs.com/2014/05/14/like-something-nightmare/#webpage","url":"https://reefs.com/2014/05/14/like-something-nightmare/","inLanguage":"en-US","name":"\u201cLike Something Out of a Nightmare\u201d - Reefs.com","isPartOf":{"@id":"https://reefs.com/#website"},"image":{"@type":"ImageObject","@id":"https://reefs.com/2014/05/14/like-something-nightmare/#primaryimage","url":"https://cdn.reefs.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Screen-Shot-2014-05-14-at-5.45.57-PM.png","width":200,"height":200},"primaryImageOfPage":{"@id":"https://reefs.com/2014/05/14/like-something-nightmare/#primaryimage"},"datePublished":"-0001-11-30T00:00:00+00:00","dateModified":"2015-10-05T22:53:20+00:00","description":"\u201cLike Something Out of a Nightmare\u201d - There are two Academy groups currently in the Philippines for the 2014 Biodiversity Expedition: one from Research, and the other from the Aquarium. Though we’re staying at different locations, we collaborate when we can, like tonight. It all started with a 90-minute night dive at Anilao Pier to try to collect a Bobbitt worm\u2014a creature that lives in the sand, has jaws like a bear trap, and might be several meters long. It shoots up with lightning speed to catch fish and other animals, yanking them down into the muck like something out of a nightmare. In the 1990s, Academy Senior Curator Terry Gosliner named\u00a0the Bobbitt worm after Lorena Bobbitt (and her legendary attack on her husband), and Academy crews have been trying to collect this animal both for display and for our preserved collection ever since. One look at the photo shows you why catching this animal isn\u2019t easy, but take a look at this video for an even better demonstration. Tonight’s effort was unsuccessful, though I did get my hand on one of the worms\u2014yes, my hand. My wife is less than thrilled about these attempts, but she understands that we have to do what we have to do for science. More efforts are planned, and hopefully there will be success. Hopefully. After the worm hunt, there was a party\u2014a party that started without us. Apparently\u00a0it began with a whole roast pig (enjoyed by both Research and Aquarium Staff), but by the time the worm hunters arrived, things had changed drastically. Let’s just say that while there was still much fun to be had, there wasn’t much pig. Expeditions like this are an amazing amount of work, similar to running a triathlon. Instead of the events being swimming, running, and biking, the events are collection, processing, and animal care. The endurance needed to put out so much energy every single day is huge, but it’s also incredibly fulfilling when everything’s going well. Tonight’s party was a short break from the draining but rewarding work of the expedition … and the only picture I can find of the event is this one of me gnawing on a pig’s head. Ah, science\u2014we love you. \u2014Rich Ross, Aquatic Biologist"},{"@type":"Article","@id":"https://reefs.com/2014/05/14/like-something-nightmare/#article","isPartOf":{"@id":"https://reefs.com/2014/05/14/like-something-nightmare/#webpage"},"author":{"@id":"https://reefs.com/author/Rich-Ross/#author","name":"Rich Ross"},"publisher":{"@id":"https://reefs.com/#organization"},"headline":"\u201cLike Something Out of a Nightmare\u201d","datePublished":"-0001-11-30T00:00:00+00:00","dateModified":"2015-10-05T22:53:20+00:00","commentCount":0,"mainEntityOfPage":"https://reefs.com/2014/05/14/like-something-nightmare/#webpage","image":{"@id":"https://reefs.com/2014/05/14/like-something-nightmare/#primaryimage"},"keywords":"academy,Aquarium,Australia,chief,diving,fish,guinea,marine,philippine,research,science","articleSection":"Events,Fish,Science"},{"@type":"Person","@id":"https://reefs.com/author/Rich-Ross/#author","name":"Rich Ross","image":{"@type":"ImageObject","@id":"https://reefs.com/#personlogo","url":"https://cdn.reefs.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/rich.jpg","caption":"Rich Ross"},"description":"Richard Ross currently works as an Aquatic Biologist at the Steinhart Aquarium in the California Academy of Sciences, maintaining many exhibits including the 212,000 gallon Philippine Coral Reef. He has kept saltwater animals for over 25 years, and has worked in aquarium maintenance, retail, wholesale and has consulted for a coral farm/fish collecting station in the South Pacific. Richard enjoys all aspects of the aquarium hobby and is a regular author for trade publications, a frequent speaker at aquarium conferences and was a founder of one of the largest and most progressive reef clubs in Northern California, Bay Area Reefers. He is an avid underwater videographer and has been fortunate to scuba dive in a lot of places around the world. At home he maintains a 300 gallon reef system and a 250 gallon cephalopod/fish breeding system, and was one of the first people to close the life cycle of Sepia bandensis. When not doing all that stuff, he enjoys spending time with his patient wife, his incredible daughter and their menagerie of animals, both wet and dry.","sameAs":[]}]}

“Like Something Out of a Nightmare”

Rich RossBy Rich Ross 5 years ago
Home  /  Events  /  “Like Something Out of a Nightmare”

There are two Academy groups currently in the Philippines for the 2014 Biodiversity Expedition: one from Research, and the other from the Aquarium. Though we’re staying at different locations, we collaborate when we can, like tonight. It all started with a 90-minute night dive at Anilao Pier to try to collect a Bobbitt worm—a creature that lives in the sand, has jaws like a bear trap, and might be several meters long. It shoots up with lightning speed to catch fish and other animals, yanking them down into the muck like something out of a nightmare. In the 1990s, Academy Senior Curator Terry Gosliner named the Bobbitt worm after Lorena Bobbitt (and her legendary attack on her husband), and Academy crews have been trying to collect this animal both for display and for our preserved collection ever since. One look at the photo shows you why catching this animal isn’t easy, but take a look at this video for an even better demonstration. Tonight’s effort was unsuccessful, though I did get my hand on one of the worms—yes, my hand. My wife is less than thrilled about these attempts, but she understands that we have to do what we have to do for science. More efforts are planned, and hopefully there will be success. Hopefully. After the worm hunt, there was a party—a party that started without MORE: “Like Something Out of a Nightmare”

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  Events, Fish, Science
Rich Ross
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 Rich Ross

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Richard Ross currently works as an Aquatic Biologist at the Steinhart Aquarium in the California Academy of Sciences, maintaining many exhibits including the 212,000 gallon Philippine Coral Reef. He has kept saltwater animals for over 25 years, and has worked in aquarium maintenance, retail, wholesale and has consulted for a coral farm/fish collecting station in the South Pacific. Richard enjoys all aspects of the aquarium hobby and is a regular author for trade publications, a frequent speaker at aquarium conferences and was a founder of one of the largest and most progressive reef clubs in Northern California, Bay Area Reefers. He is an avid underwater videographer and has been fortunate to scuba dive in a lot of places around the world. At home he maintains a 300 gallon reef system and a 250 gallon cephalopod/fish breeding system, and was one of the first people to close the life cycle of Sepia bandensis. When not doing all that stuff, he enjoys spending time with his patient wife, his incredible daughter and their menagerie of animals, both wet and dry.

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