Dolphins Use ‘Mud Nets’ To Catch Fish

Francis YupangcoBy Francis Yupangco 3 years ago
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Dolphins trick fish with mud “nets” | One Life | BBC

BBC Earth presents One Life. Narrated by Daniel Craig, written and directed by Michael Gunton & Martha Holmes. Coming to theaters February 21!

 Who among us doesn’t love dolphins? They are often considered some of the smartest animals and are very quick learners. With my many years working in the public aquarium industry, I’ve developed quite an affinity for them and can vouch for how clever these marine mammals really are.Dolphin behavior is often studied and seen as a sign of true intelligence. In this fascinating video, you can see that these dolphins have devised a very smart way of catching fish in the shallow water. The dolphin pod communicates and works together to drive the school of fish into a circle as they beat their tails in unison in the shallow water to stir up the muddy bottom. The dolphins can be observed herding the fish into a smaller and smaller area while creating something that can be described as a fishing net made of mud. This action creates a ring of mud which traps the fish and scares them into jumping out of the water right into the dolphins’ gaping mouths. This behavior is a good example of how dolphins have developed unique skills to make their lives easier. Other dolphin species have been observed using tools to make their lives easier.

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  Fish, Science
Francis Yupangco
About

 Francis Yupangco

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Francis is a marine biologist with an MBA and over 20 years of professional aquarium experience. Francis is the former Aquatic Development Manager at Hagen USA., makers of Fluval brand aquarium products. He co-stars on Nat Geo WILD's reality TV series Fish Tank Kings where he is the resident "Fish Geek" and was Director of Marketing at Living Color Aquariums. He is an avid explorer having visited over 45 countries and lived in 7. At 17, he was among the youngest aquarists ever hired by the Vancouver Aquarium, where he worked for 7 years. His aquatic biology experience ranges from larval fish rearing to the design, construction and operational management of renowned public aquariums around the world. Francis is currently head of marketing at the world's largest vertically integrated fish farming company.

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